Overview | Support And Transport Systems In Plants | Siyavula

Overview

Chapter 5: Support and transport systems in plants

5.1 Overview (ESG79)

The previous chapter discussed the structure of plant and animal tissue. This chapter focuses on the plant tissues that transport food and water around the plant. Learners have previously been taught that plant leaves use sunlight, carbon dioxide and water to make sugars (food) during photosynthesis. The next concept is understanding how the phloem and xylem tissue transport food and water within the plant. Which cells are responsible for moving food throughout the plant? How are the tissues adapted for their functions in transporting either water or food? What do these cells look like under the microscope?

Learners will further explore the relationship between structure and function by studying how different types of leaves are structurally adapted to minimise water loss. In addition, this chapter will explain how stomata are able to respond to environmental conditions in order to regulate the rate of water loss from the leaf during transpiration.

Key Concepts:

  • The plant is made up of the root and stem where tissues with dividing (meristematic) cells are contained.
  • Secondary growth of trees is measurable by observing the annual rings within tree trunks and can be used to infer climate change.
  • Transpiration, the loss of water vapour from plant leaves, is influenced by factors such as temperature, light intensity, wind and humidity.
  • Wilting is a processes that results from loss of water through transpiration and guttation is a process that results from high root pressure.
  • Water and minerals are taken up into the xylem tissue present in roots and transported to leaves in the plant.
  • Manufactured food (sugar) is translocated, via phloem tissue, from sites of manufacture (in the leaves) to other parts of the plant where sugars are used or stored.

The following website provides information on plant structure and support and may be used as a resource for this chapter:

Introduction (ESG7B)

In the previous chapter, the structure of plant and animal tissue was introduced. This chapter focuses on the plant tissues that transport food and water around the plant. As you have previously learnt, plant leaves use sunlight, carbon dioxide and water to make food (sugars) during photosynthesis. In this chapter we will examine how the phloem and xylem tissue transport food and water within the plant. Which cells are responsible for moving food throughout the plant? How are the tissues adapted for their functions in transporting either water or food? What do these cells look like under the microscope?

Throughout this chapter we will emphasise the relationship between structure and function. We will study how different types of leaves are structurally adapted to minimise water loss. We will also learn how stomata are able to respond to environmental conditions in order to regulate the rate of water loss from the leaf during transpiration.

  • The plant is made up of the root and stem where tissues with dividing (meristematic) cells are contained.
  • Secondary growth of trees is measurable by observing the annual rings within tree trunks and can be used to infer climate change.
  • Transpiration, the loss of water vapour from plant leaves, is influenced by factors such as temperature, light intensity, wind and humidity.
  • Wilting is a processes that results from loss of water through transpiration and guttation is a process that results from high root pressure.
  • Water and minerals are taken up into the xylem tissue present in roots and transported to leaves in the plant.
  • Manufactured food (sugar) is translocated, via phloem tissue, from sites of manufacture (in the leaves) to other parts of the plant where sugars are used or stored.